Contents
  1. Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence
  2. Rabbit-Proof Fence: Cheat Sheet
  3. Rabbit Proof Fence - History of Ag SA
  4. Rabbit Proof Fence

They called it the Rabbit Proof Fence, and it stretched fully woman of the Mardu once gave a white supervisor of the Rabbit Proof Fence. This module has been designed to accompany the film Rabbit-Proof Fence ( ). Rabbit-Proof Fence tells the true story of three Aboriginal Australian girls. PDF | Since the colonisation of Australia, the relationship between One such film is Rabbit-Proof Fence, directed by Phillip Noyce and based.

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Rabbit Proof Fence Pdf

PDF file of this excellent resource for teachers click here). Why Global? Set in Australia in , Rabbit-Proof Fence tells the story of three young girls who. Corso di Laurea in lingue e civiltà moderne e contemporanee Prova finale di Laurea An analysis of Doris Pilkington's Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence Relatore . Rabbit Proof Fence (original film title). Your task: Use your phrase to guess what kind of story will be told in the film. Be prepared to present your ideas to the.

Acknowledgments I gratefully acknowledge my mother and my aunt for sharing this story with me, and the Aboriginal Arts Board for making it possible for me to publish their experience. To those who have advised and supported me in this project, I extend my thanks and appreciation. Map revised Introduction The trek back home to Jigalong in the north-west of Western Australia from the Moore River Native Settlement just north of Perth was not only a historical event, it was also one of the most incredible feats imaginable, undertaken by three Aboriginal girls in the s. The two surviving members of the trio, my mother and her sister Daisy, are now in their late sixties and seventies and are anxious for their story to be published before they die. This is the custom in traditional Aboriginal communities where the name of a person is never mentioned after their death. For example, Adam Thomas would be addressed as Nguberu Thomas following the death of another man named Adam. The task of reconstructing the trek home from the settlement has been both an exhausting and an interesting experience.

Solitary confinement was doled out as regular punishment. The girls were not even allowed to speak their language. Of all the journeys made since white people set foot on Australian soil, the journey made by these girls born of Aboriginal mothers and white fathers speaks something to everyone. I gratefully acknowledge my mother and my aunt for sharing this story with me, and the Aboriginal Arts Board for making it possible for me to publish their experience.

To those who have advised and supported me in this project, I extend my thanks and appreciation.

The trek back home to Jigalong in the north-west of Western Australia from the Moore River Native Settlement just north of Perth was not only a historical event, it was also one of the most incredible feats imaginable, undertaken by three Aboriginal girls in the s. The two surviving members of the trio, my mother and her sister Daisy, are now in their late sixties and seventies and are anxious for their story to be published before they die.

Follow the Rabbit-Proof Fence

This is the custom in traditional Aboriginal communities where the name of a person is never mentioned after their death. For example, Adam Thomas would be addressed as Nguberu Thomas following the death of another man named Adam. The task of reconstructing the trek home from the settlement has been both an exhausting and an interesting experience.

One needed to have a vivid imagination, the patience of many saints and the determination to succeed despite the odds.

Rabbit-Proof Fence: Cheat Sheet

Molly, Daisy and Gracie were outside familiar territory so I found it necessary to become a ten-year-old girl again in order to draw on my own childhood memories of the countryside surrounding the settlement. In my mind I walked the same paths and called on my skills as a writer to describe the scenery and how it looked through their eyes. By combining my imagination and the information from records of geographical and botanical explorations undertaken in the area during the early s and later, I was able to build a clearer picture of the vegetation and landscape through which the girls trekked.

There were so many other factors that had to be taken into consideration when telling their story. First, how was I going to reconstruct a landscape which had either changed considerably or disappeared completely. At the time of the event much of the terrain was uncleared virgin bush, a strange, scary wilderness to these three girls who came from the desert regions of Western Australia. In addition to this, there were no major highways linking the towns that were scattered in the country north-east of Perth.

Molly, Gracie and Daisy passed through parts of the country that changed every 15 or 20 kilometres, with each change of scenery bringing more tension as food and sustenance became harder to procure.

Age presented no problem for my mother and aunty. Their minds were sharp and they had no difficulty recounting their experiences along the way, however, I realise that consideration must be given to the time lapse since they were young at the time, and to allow for patches of dimmed memories and sketchy reflections. Another fact I completely overlooked until the interviews began was their illiteracy. This, combined with their lack of numeracy skills, made it impossible to establish measurements accurately.

Numbers, dates, in fact mathematics of any kind, have little or no relevance in our traditional Aboriginal society. Nature was their social calendar, everything was measured by events and incidents affected by seasonal changes. For example, summer is pink-eye time when eye problems brought on by the heat, dust and flies flare up. This was the period when station workers took their annual holidays.

Pink-eye time was the common term used for weekends and days off from normal duties on the stations in the Pilbara region. The winter or rainy season is yalta or galyu time. Similarly the days of the week were named according to which domestic duties were carried out on: Monday was referred to as washing day, Tuesday was ironing day, Wednesday was mending day, and so on.

Time was also marked by activities of cultural and ceremonial significance. For example, the people in Jigalong and the Gibson Desert regions use a specific event or incident when telling stories.

Their stories, whether they be oral history or anecdotes, do not begin in the same way as Western stories: I remember clearly it was during the Christmas holidays in when Rather the speaker will remind the listeners that, It was galyu time.

Galyu everywhere, all the roads were cut off Or, It was Ngulungga time when we had that big meeting. The listeners know that this was the time when traditional rites and rituals were performed. So in these communities time is based on practical events, incidents and seasons. When recounting the long walk home, Aunty Daisy mentioned how they chased emu chicks at the Nannine railway siding south of Meekatharra.

She described how the chicks were striped in black and white. By combining research and personal observation I was able to establish that the chicks must have been a certain age and so it would have been either late August or September. Seasonal time and not numbers is important in recounting this journey. Consistent with Aboriginal storytelling style, seasonal time and the features of the natural environment are more important to recounting this journey than are the western notions of time and distance.

I have though worked to synthesise these different forms of knowledge to give readers the fullest insight into this historic journey. This journey took place when there were no highways or sealed roads criss-crossing the continent, only gravel roads or more often, dirt tracks and trails made by carts, sulkies and light, early model cars.

The girls avoided these routes, especially where the rabbit-proof fence came near towns such as Sandstone. Walking along the tracks and trails, the girls knew that they would have been too exposed to the white population and their whereabouts would have been immediately reported to the local police. Molly, Gracie and Daisy came from a remote community in the north-west of Western Australia where the white population tended to stick tightly together, and maintained contact by pedal wireless, telephone and mail.

Aware of this the girls aimed to pass by silently and swiftly without being detected and to reach home as fast as they could. It was still very cool in the early summer morning; the fresh, clean air he breathed into his lungs felt good. He stood up and stretched his arms above his head then dropped them to his side. He was the first to rise.

Rabbit Proof Fence - History of Ag SA

This was not unusual, Kundilla always woke before anyone else and this morning was no different from any other. He looked slowly around at the sleeping forms covered by warm, animal-skin blankets, lying outside their shelters made from branches and slabs of bark.

There was no shortage of trees and shrubs around here, that is why this spot was chosen for the winter camp. Kundilla walked silently to perform his early morning rituals, away from the camp, which was situated in a clearing a hundred metres from the river. On his return he stopped along the banks of the river to pull up the fish traps he had set the previous evening.

How peaceful it was, with the sounds of birds twittering high above, amid the leafy branches of the giant river gums, and the occasional splash of the fish in the river.

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Book Details Author: Doris Pilkington Pages: University of Queensland Press Brand: