History of western art pdf

 
    Contents
  1. ART 232 - The History of Western Art II
  2. A History of European Art
  3. A History of Western Art by Sewall (Art Ebook).pdf | Gothic Architecture | Sculpture
  4. A History of Western Art

This books (A History of Western Art [PDF]) Made by Laurie Adams About Books Title: A History of Western Art Binding: Paperback Author. Te visual arts of Europe and America provide a fascinating entry into a study of the history, religion, and ideas that have shaped our culture. In this course. Laurie Schneider Adams HISTORY OF WESTERN ART FIFTH EDITION This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank A History of Western .

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History Of Western Art Pdf

PDF | On Jan 8, , Ainahimla Himlay and others published DOWNLOAD [PDF ] A History of Western Art by Laurie Schneider Adams. A History of Western Art by Sewall (Art Ebook).pdf - Free ebook download as PDF File .pdf), Text File .txt) or read book online for free. This is an introductory survey of art created in the period from the end of the Roman and Byzantine empires through the Renaissance. In this course, we will.

Saint Matthew from the Lindisfarne Gospels. Most surviving art from the Medieval period was religious in focus, often funded by the Church , powerful ecclesiastical individuals such as bishops , communal groups such as abbeys , or wealthy secular patrons. Many had specific liturgical functions—processional crosses and altarpieces , for example. One of the central questions about Medieval art concerns its lack of realism. A great deal of knowledge of perspective in art and understanding of the human figure was lost with the fall of Rome.

ART 232 - The History of Western Art II

Thus, painters, sculptors, and architects came into their own, successfully claiming for their work a high position among the fine arts. In a sense, 16th- century masters created a new profession with its own rights of expression and its own venerable character. Hieronymus Bosch ? In his paintings, he used religious themes, but combined them with grotesque fantasies, colourful imagery, and peasant folk legends. His paintings often reflect the confusion and anguish associated with the end of the Middle Ages.

Time Period: Italian Renaissance: Late 14th century to Early 16th century Northern Renaissance: 16th century Main articles: Mannerism , Baroque , and Rococo Differences between Baroque and Rococo art Baroque art was characterised by strongly religious and political themes; common characteristics included rich colours with a strong light and dark contrast. Paintings were elaborate, emotional and dramatic in nature.

In the image Caravaggio 's Christ at the Column Cristo alla colonna Rococo art was characterised by lighter, often jocular themes; common characteristics included pale, creamy colours, florid decorations and a penchant for bucolic landscapes.

Paintings were more ornate than their Baroque counterpart, and usually graceful, playful and light-hearted in nature. Mannerism, a reaction against the idealist perfection of Classicism, employed distortion of light and spatial frameworks in order to emphasize the emotional content of a painting and the emotions of the painter.

The work of El Greco is a particularly clear example of Mannerism in painting during the late 16th, early 17th centuries. Northern Mannerism took longer to develop, and was largely a movement of the last half of the 16th century. Baroque art took the representationalism of the Renaissance to new heights, emphasizing detail, movement, lighting, and drama in their search for beauty.

A rather different art developed out of northern realist traditions in 17th-century Dutch Golden Age painting , which had very little religious art, and little history painting , instead playing a crucial part in developing secular genres such as still life , genre paintings of everyday scenes, and landscape painting. While the Baroque nature of Rembrandt's art is clear, the label is less use for Vermeer and many other Dutch artists.

Flemish Baroque painting shared a part in this trend, while also continuing to produce the traditional categories. Baroque art is often seen as part of the Counter-Reformation —the artistic element of the revival of spiritual life in the Roman Catholic Church.

Additionally, the emphasis that Baroque art placed on grandeur is seen as Absolutist in nature. Religious and political themes were widely explored within the Baroque artistic context, and both paintings and sculptures were characterised by a strong element of drama, emotion and theatricality. Famous Baroque artists include Caravaggio or Rubens.

Pomp and grandeur were important elements of the Baroque artistic movement in general, as can be seen when Louis XIV said, "I am grandeur incarnate"; many Baroque artists served kings who tried to realize this goal.

Baroque art in many ways was similar to Renaissance art; as a matter of fact, the term was initially used in a derogative manner to describe post-Renaissance art and architecture which was over-elaborate.

By the 18th century, however, Baroque art was falling out of fashion as many deemed it too melodramatic and also gloomy, and it developed into the Rococo , which emerged in France.

Rococo art was even more elaborate than the Baroque, but it was less serious and more playful. The artistic movement no longer placed an emphasis on politics and religion, focusing instead on lighter themes such as romance, celebration, and appreciation of nature. Rococo art also contrasted the Baroque as it often refused symmetry in favor of asymmetrical designs.

Furthermore, it sought inspiration from the artistic forms and ornamentation of Far Eastern Asia , resulting in the rise in favour of porcelain figurines and chinoiserie in general. Neoclassicism in many ways developed as a counter movement of the Rococo, the impetus being a sense of disgust directed towards the latter's florid qualities. Time Period: Baroque : early 17th century to mid-early 18th century Rococo : early to midth century Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Academism and Realism[ edit ] Main articles: Neoclassicism , Romantic art , Academic art , and Realism arts Neoclassical art, inspired by different classical themes, was characterised by an emphasis on simplicity, order and idealism.

In the image Antonio Canova 's Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss Throughout the 18th century, a counter movement opposing the Rococo sprang up in different parts of Europe, commonly known as Neoclassicism. It despised the perceived superficiality and frivolity of Rococo art, and desired for a return to the simplicity, order and 'purism' of classical antiquity, especially ancient Greece and Rome.

The movement was in part also influenced by the Renaissance, which itself was strongly influenced by classical art.

A History of European Art

Neoclassicism was the artistic component of the intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment ; the Enlightenment was idealistic, and put its emphasis on objectivity, reason and empirical truth. Neoclassicism had become widespread in Europe throughout the 18th century, especially in the United Kingdom , which saw great works of Neoclassical architecture spring up during this period; Neoclassicism's fascination with classical antiquity can be seen in the popularity of the Grand Tour during this decade, where wealthy aristocrats travelled to the ancient ruins of Italy and Greece.

Nevertheless, a defining moment for Neoclassicism came during the French Revolution in the late 18th century; in France, Rococo art was replaced with the preferred Neoclassical art, which was seen as more serious than the former movement.

In many ways, Neoclassicism can be seen as a political movement as well as an artistic and cultural one. Ingres , Canova , and Jacques-Louis David are among the best-known neoclassicists. Just as Mannerism rejected Classicism, so did Romanticism reject the ideas of the Enlightenment and the aesthetic of the Neoclassicists. Romanticism rejected the highly objective and ordered nature of Neoclassicism, and opted for a more individual and emotional approach to the arts.

Romantic art was about individual feelings, not common themes, such as in Neoclassicism; in such a way, Romantic art often used colours in order to express feelings and emotion. Romantic art also takes much of its aesthetic qualities from medievalism and Gothicism , as well as mythology and folklore.

The different attempts took place within the French Academy, and collectively are called Academic art. Adolphe William Bouguereau is considered a chief example of this stream of art. In the early 19th century the face of Europe, however, became radically altered by industrialization. Poverty, squalor, and desperation were to be the fate of the new working class created by the "revolution".

In response to these changes going on in society, the movement of Realism emerged. Realism sought to accurately portray the conditions and hardships of the poor in the hopes of changing society.

In contrast with Romanticism, which was essentially optimistic about mankind, Realism offered a stark vision of poverty and despair. Similarly, while Romanticism glorified nature, Realism portrayed life in the depths of an urban wasteland. Like Romanticism, Realism was a literary as well as an artistic movement. The response of architecture to industrialisation, in stark contrast to the other arts, was to veer towards historicism. Although the railway stations built during this period are often considered the truest reflections of its spirit — they are sometimes called "the cathedrals of the age" — the main movements in architecture during the Industrial Age were revivals of styles from the distant past, such as the Gothic Revival.

Related movements were the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood , who attempted to return art to its state of "purity" prior to Raphael , and the Arts and Crafts Movement , which reacted against the impersonality of mass-produced goods and advocated a return to medieval craftsmanship.

Time Period: Neoclassicism : mid-early 18th century to early 19th century Romanticism : late 18th century to midth century. Donatello created many of its sculptures. Giotto and Lorenzo Ghiberti also contributed to the cathedral. The 15th-century artistic developments in Italy for example, the interest in perspectival systems, in depicting anatomy, and in classical cultures matured during the 16th century, accounting for the designations "Early Renaissance" for the 15th century and "High Renaissance" for the 16th century.

Although no singular style characterizes the High Renaissance, the art of those most closely associated with this Period—Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian—exhibits an astounding mastery, both technical and aesthetic. High Renaissance artists created works of such authority that generations of later artists relied on these artworks for instruction.

These exemplary artistic creations further elevated the prestige of artists. Artists could claim divine inspiration, thereby raising visual art to a status formerly given only to poetry.

Thus, painters, sculptors, and architects came into their own, successfully claiming for their work a high position among the fine arts. In a sense, 16th- century masters created a new profession with its own rights of expression and its own venerable character. Hieronymus Bosch ? In his paintings, he used religious themes, but combined them with grotesque fantasies, colourful imagery, and peasant folk legends.

His paintings often reflect the confusion and anguish associated with the end of the Middle Ages. Time Period: Italian Renaissance: Late 14th century to Early 16th century Northern Renaissance: 16th century Main articles: Mannerism , Baroque , and Rococo Differences between Baroque and Rococo art Baroque art was characterised by strongly religious and political themes; common characteristics included rich colours with a strong light and dark contrast.

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Paintings were elaborate, emotional and dramatic in nature. In the image Caravaggio 's Christ at the Column Cristo alla colonna Rococo art was characterised by lighter, often jocular themes; common characteristics included pale, creamy colours, florid decorations and a penchant for bucolic landscapes.

Paintings were more ornate than their Baroque counterpart, and usually graceful, playful and light-hearted in nature. Mannerism, a reaction against the idealist perfection of Classicism, employed distortion of light and spatial frameworks in order to emphasize the emotional content of a painting and the emotions of the painter.

The work of El Greco is a particularly clear example of Mannerism in painting during the late 16th, early 17th centuries. Northern Mannerism took longer to develop, and was largely a movement of the last half of the 16th century. Baroque art took the representationalism of the Renaissance to new heights, emphasizing detail, movement, lighting, and drama in their search for beauty.

A History of Western Art by Sewall (Art Ebook).pdf | Gothic Architecture | Sculpture

A rather different art developed out of northern realist traditions in 17th-century Dutch Golden Age painting , which had very little religious art, and little history painting , instead playing a crucial part in developing secular genres such as still life , genre paintings of everyday scenes, and landscape painting. While the Baroque nature of Rembrandt's art is clear, the label is less use for Vermeer and many other Dutch artists.

Flemish Baroque painting shared a part in this trend, while also continuing to produce the traditional categories. Baroque art is often seen as part of the Counter-Reformation —the artistic element of the revival of spiritual life in the Roman Catholic Church.

Additionally, the emphasis that Baroque art placed on grandeur is seen as Absolutist in nature. Religious and political themes were widely explored within the Baroque artistic context, and both paintings and sculptures were characterised by a strong element of drama, emotion and theatricality. Famous Baroque artists include Caravaggio or Rubens.

Pomp and grandeur were important elements of the Baroque artistic movement in general, as can be seen when Louis XIV said, "I am grandeur incarnate"; many Baroque artists served kings who tried to realize this goal.

Baroque art in many ways was similar to Renaissance art; as a matter of fact, the term was initially used in a derogative manner to describe post-Renaissance art and architecture which was over-elaborate. By the 18th century, however, Baroque art was falling out of fashion as many deemed it too melodramatic and also gloomy, and it developed into the Rococo , which emerged in France.

Rococo art was even more elaborate than the Baroque, but it was less serious and more playful. The artistic movement no longer placed an emphasis on politics and religion, focusing instead on lighter themes such as romance, celebration, and appreciation of nature. Rococo art also contrasted the Baroque as it often refused symmetry in favor of asymmetrical designs. Furthermore, it sought inspiration from the artistic forms and ornamentation of Far Eastern Asia , resulting in the rise in favour of porcelain figurines and chinoiserie in general.

Neoclassicism in many ways developed as a counter movement of the Rococo, the impetus being a sense of disgust directed towards the latter's florid qualities. Time Period: Baroque : early 17th century to mid-early 18th century Rococo : early to midth century Neoclassicism, Romanticism, Academism and Realism[ edit ] Main articles: Neoclassicism , Romantic art , Academic art , and Realism arts Neoclassical art, inspired by different classical themes, was characterised by an emphasis on simplicity, order and idealism.

In the image Antonio Canova 's Psyche Revived by Cupid's Kiss Throughout the 18th century, a counter movement opposing the Rococo sprang up in different parts of Europe, commonly known as Neoclassicism.

It despised the perceived superficiality and frivolity of Rococo art, and desired for a return to the simplicity, order and 'purism' of classical antiquity, especially ancient Greece and Rome. The movement was in part also influenced by the Renaissance, which itself was strongly influenced by classical art.

Neoclassicism was the artistic component of the intellectual movement known as the Enlightenment ; the Enlightenment was idealistic, and put its emphasis on objectivity, reason and empirical truth.

Neoclassicism had become widespread in Europe throughout the 18th century, especially in the United Kingdom , which saw great works of Neoclassical architecture spring up during this period; Neoclassicism's fascination with classical antiquity can be seen in the popularity of the Grand Tour during this decade, where wealthy aristocrats travelled to the ancient ruins of Italy and Greece.

Nevertheless, a defining moment for Neoclassicism came during the French Revolution in the late 18th century; in France, Rococo art was replaced with the preferred Neoclassical art, which was seen as more serious than the former movement. In many ways, Neoclassicism can be seen as a political movement as well as an artistic and cultural one. Ingres , Canova , and Jacques-Louis David are among the best-known neoclassicists.

Just as Mannerism rejected Classicism, so did Romanticism reject the ideas of the Enlightenment and the aesthetic of the Neoclassicists.

A History of Western Art

Romanticism rejected the highly objective and ordered nature of Neoclassicism, and opted for a more individual and emotional approach to the arts. Romantic art was about individual feelings, not common themes, such as in Neoclassicism; in such a way, Romantic art often used colours in order to express feelings and emotion. Romantic art also takes much of its aesthetic qualities from medievalism and Gothicism , as well as mythology and folklore.

The different attempts took place within the French Academy, and collectively are called Academic art. Adolphe William Bouguereau is considered a chief example of this stream of art. In the early 19th century the face of Europe, however, became radically altered by industrialization. Poverty, squalor, and desperation were to be the fate of the new working class created by the "revolution".

In response to these changes going on in society, the movement of Realism emerged. Realism sought to accurately portray the conditions and hardships of the poor in the hopes of changing society.

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